Diversity of Methane-Cycling Archaea in Hydrothermal Sediment Investigated by General and Group-Specific PCR Primers

@article{Lever2014DiversityOM,
  title={Diversity of Methane-Cycling Archaea in Hydrothermal Sediment Investigated by General and Group-Specific PCR Primers},
  author={Mark Alexander Lever and Andreas P. Teske},
  journal={Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
  year={2014},
  volume={81},
  pages={1426 - 1441}
}
  • M. Lever, A. Teske
  • Published 19 December 2014
  • Biology
  • Applied and Environmental Microbiology
ABSTRACT The zonation of anaerobic methane-cycling Archaea in hydrothermal sediment of Guaymas Basin was studied by general primer pairs (mcrI, ME1/ME2, mcrIRD) targeting the alpha subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) and by new group-specific mcrA and 16S rRNA gene primer pairs. The mcrIRD primer pair outperformed the other general mcrA primer pairs in detection sensitivity and phylogenetic coverage. Methanotrophic ANME-1 Archaea were the only group detected with group-specific… 
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TLDR
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