Diversity in the Economics Profession: A New Attack on an Old Problem

@article{Bayer2016DiversityIT,
  title={Diversity in the Economics Profession: A New Attack on an Old Problem},
  author={Amanda Bayer and Cecilia Elena Rouse},
  journal={Journal of Economic Perspectives},
  year={2016},
  volume={30},
  pages={221-242}
}
The economics profession includes disproportionately few women and members of historically underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups, relative both to the overall population and to other academic disciplines. The relative lack of women, African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans within economics is present at the undergraduate level, continues throughout the academy, and is barely improving over time. In this paper, we present data on the presence of women and minority groups… Expand

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