Diversity and evolutionary history of plastids and their hosts.

@article{Keeling2004DiversityAE,
  title={Diversity and evolutionary history of plastids and their hosts.},
  author={Patrick J. Keeling},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2004},
  volume={91 10},
  pages={
          1481-93
        }
}
  • P. Keeling
  • Published 1 October 2004
  • Biology
  • American journal of botany
By synthesizing data from individual gene phylogenies, large concatenated gene trees, and other kinds of molecular, morphological, and biochemical markers, we begin to see the broad outlines of a global phylogenetic tree of eukaryotes. This tree is apparently composed of five large assemblages, or "supergroups." Plants and algae, or more generally eukaryotes with plastids (the photosynthetic organelle of plants and algae and their nonphotosynthetic derivatives) are scattered among four of the… 

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