Diversity and Evolution of Plastids and Their Genomes

@inproceedings{Kim2008DiversityAE,
  title={Diversity and Evolution of Plastids and Their Genomes},
  author={E. Kim and John M. Archibald},
  year={2008}
}
Plastids, the light-harvesting organelles of plants and algae, are the descendants of cyanobacterial endosymbionts that became permanent fixtures inside nonphotosynthetic eukaryotic host cells. This chapter provides an overview of the structural, functional and molecular diversity of plastids in the context of current views on the evolutionary relationships among the eukaryotic hosts in which they reside. Green algae, land plants, red algae and glaucophyte algae harbor double-membrane-bound… 

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