Diversification in an Early Cretaceous avian genus: evidence from a new species of Confuciusornis from China

@article{Zhang2009DiversificationIA,
  title={Diversification in an Early Cretaceous avian genus: evidence from a new species of Confuciusornis from China},
  author={Zihui Zhang and Chunling Gao and Qingjin Meng and Jinyuan Liu and Lian-hai Hou and Guang-mei Zheng},
  journal={Journal of Ornithology},
  year={2009},
  volume={150},
  pages={783-790}
}
A new species of Confuciusornis, the oldest known beaked bird, is erected based on a nearly complete fossil from the Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of western Liaoning, northeast China. C. feducciai is the largest and shows the highest ratio of the forelimb to the hindlimb among all known species of Confuciusornis. The skeletal qualitative autapomorphies, including a V-shaped furcula, a rectangular deltopectoral crest, the absence of an oval foramen at the proximal end of the humerus, the… 

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