Diversification and spatial structuring in the mutualism between Ficus septica and its pollinating wasps in insular South East Asia

@article{Rodriguez2017DiversificationAS,
  title={Diversification and spatial structuring in the mutualism between Ficus septica and its pollinating wasps in insular South East Asia},
  author={Lillian Jennifer V. Rodriguez and Anthony Lamont Bain and Lien-Siang Chou and Lucie Conchou and Astrid Cruaud and Regielene S. Gonzales and Martine Hossaert-McKey and Jean‐Yves Rasplus and Hsy-Yu Tzeng and Finn Kjellberg},
  journal={BMC Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2017},
  volume={17}
}
BackgroundInterspecific interactions have long been assumed to play an important role in diversification. Mutualistic interactions, such as nursery pollination mutualisms, have been proposed as good candidates for diversification through co-speciation because of their intricate nature. However, little is known about how speciation and diversification proceeds in emblematic nursery pollination systems such as figs and fig wasps. Here, we analyse diversification in connection with spatial… 
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