Diverging patterns of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity in subarctic black spruce: imprint of a founder effect associated with postglacial colonization

@article{Gamache2003DivergingPO,
  title={Diverging patterns of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity in subarctic black spruce: imprint of a founder effect associated with postglacial colonization},
  author={Isabelle Gamache and Juan P. Jaramillo‐Correa and Serge Payette and Jean Bousquet},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2003},
  volume={12}
}
High‐latitude ecotonal populations at the species margins may exhibit altered patterns of genetic diversity, resulting from more or less recent founder events and from bottleneck effects in response to climate oscillations. Patterns of genetic diversity were investigated in nine populations of the conifer black spruce (Picea mariana[Mill.] BSP.) in northwestern Québec, Canada, using seed‐dispersed mitochondrial (mt) DNA and nuclear (nc) DNA. mtDNA diversity (mitotypes) was assessed at three… 
Variation in mitochondrial DNA reveals multiple distant glacial refugia in black spruce (Picea mariana), a transcontinental North American conifer
TLDR
Comparison of the genetic structure derived from mtDNA markers and the colonization paths previously deduced from the fossil and pollen records allow us to infer at least three southern and one northeastern glacial populations for black spruce.
From glacial refugia to modern populations: new assemblages of organelle genomes generated by differential cytoplasmic gene flow in transcontinental black spruce
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Black spruce postglacial colonization unexpectedly resulted in an increase in genetic diversity with possible adaptive consequences, and the patterns of variation in Alaska for both cpDNA and mtDNA markers suggested that black spruce survived the last glacial maximum in this northern region.
A mitochondrial DNA minisatellite reveals the postglacial history of jack pine (Pinus banksiana), a broad‐range North American conifer
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The results indicate the significant role of the northern part of the US Appalachian Mountains as a factor of vicariance during the ice age and the mitochondrial DNA variation of jack pine is geographically highly structured and it correlates well with large‐scale patterns emerging from recent phylogeographical studies of other tree boreal species in North America.
Decoupled mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA population structure reveals Holocene collapse and population isolation in a threatened Mexican‐endemic conifer
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These various trends are consistent with the hypothesis of a population collapse during the Holocene warming and suggest that most of the modern P. chihuahuana populations are now effectively isolated with their genetic diversity essentially modelled by genetic drift.
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The results indicate that one of the three potential areas hypothesized to have harboured ancestral populations of Pinus leiophylla may be related to the origin of P. chihuahuana, while the other two may be unrelated to the start of this species.
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Several small steppe populations showed high genetic diversity and divergent gene pools, suggesting that they constitute ancient refuges from pre-Holocene glaciations with just a subgroup of them contributing significantly to post-glacial spread.
Phylogeography of the endangered Cathaya argyrophylla (Pinaceae) inferred from sequence variation of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA
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Non‐overlapping distribution of mitotypes and high genetic differentiation among the distinct geographical groups suggest the existence of at least four separate glacial refugia in C. argyrophylla.
New evidence from mitochondrial DNA of a progenitor-derivative species relationship between black spruce and red spruce (Pinaceae).
TLDR
Comparison of present and previously published data supports the hypothesis of a recent progenitor-derivative relationship between these species, red spruce presumably being derived by allopatric speciation of an isolated population of black spruce during the Pleistocene.
Phylogeographic structure of jack pine (Pinus banksiana; Pinaceae) supports the existence of a coastal glacial refugium in northeastern North America.
TLDR
MtDNA data suggest that populations from the Maritimes region derive from a genetically depauperated north-coastal refugium, which could be indicative of a mid-latitude coastal refuge during the last glaciation.
Large-scale asymmetric introgression of cytoplasmic DNA reveals Holocene range displacement in a North American boreal pine complex
TLDR
The mtDNA introgression pattern indicated that central Canada was first colonized by migrants from a P. contorta glacial population located west of the Rocky Mountains, before being replaced by P. banksiana migrating westward during the Holocene.
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