Divergent taste responsiveness to fruit of the tree Antidesma bunius

@article{Henkin1977DivergentTR,
  title={Divergent taste responsiveness to fruit of the tree Antidesma bunius},
  author={Robert Irwin Henkin and William T. Gillis},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1977},
  volume={265},
  pages={536-537}
}
GENETIC divergence of taste responsiveness was first demonstrated for phenylthiocarbamide (PTC)1, the inability to taste PTC bitter being described as an inherited Mendelian recessive character, and ability to taste PTC bitter as dominant2. This hypothesis has largely been confirmed3,4 although occasional incomplete penetrance of the ‘taster’ gene has been reported. Recently, eight people were served with a pie made from antidesma berries, and two people complained that the pie was extremely… Expand
Bitter Fruit: Inverse Associations Between PTC and Antidesma bunius Perception.
Ability to perceive the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) is inherited via a dominant "taster" allele of the TAS2R38 gene, whereas inability is inherited via a recessive "non-taster" allele.Expand
Taste Perception of Antidesma bunius Fruit and Its Relationships to Bitter Taste Receptor Gene Haplotypes
TLDR
TAS2R38 haplotypes are associated with differential perception of Antidesma berry juice bitterness, and that all those who perceive this bitterness carry at least one AVI haplotype, which indicates that the A VI haplotype is necessary for this perception, but that additional variable factors are involved. Expand
Diverse tastes: Genetics of sweet and bitter perception
TLDR
This review focuses on individual variations that arise from genetic differences and review two domains of science: recent developments in the molecular biology of taste transduction, with a focus on the genes involved and studies that examine biological relatives to determine the heritability of taste perception. Expand
Different tastes for different individuals
TLDR
It is concluded that modern humans might have been losing their taste receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF taste receptor variants, one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. Expand
The relationships between phenylthiocarbamide taste perception and smoking, work out habits and susceptibility to depression
Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) is known as phenylthiourea and it is an organic compound that has the phenyl ring. Ability to perceive the tastes of PTC chemical is related to the dominance of taste genes.Expand
Phenylthiocarbamide taste perception as a possible genetic association marker for nutritional habits and obesity tendency of people.
TLDR
This study is the first attempt on a large scale to examine PTC sensitivity in healthy and overweight people in Turkish population to define in the perception of bitter senses which is associated with nutrition habits, body mass index, age, gender, and to be in stable weight. Expand
Open questions in sweet, umami and bitter taste genetics
Sweet, umami and bitter tastes are in large part mediated by G-protein coupled receptors of taste type 1 (TAS1R) and taste type 2 (TAS2R) families. The genetics and molecular function of TASExpand
Phenylthiocarbamide : A 75-Year Adventure in Genetics and Natural Selection
VARIATION in taste sensitivity to the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) is one of the best known Mendelian traits in human populations, ranking alongside eye color and blood types in theExpand
Phenylthiocarbamide: a 75-year adventure in genetics and natural selection.
TLDR
In an often-overlooked article published in 1939, Fisher et al. reported that chimpanzees, like humans, show variable sensitivity to PTC, providing strong evidence that balancing natural selection must have actively maintained variation at the locus from a time prior to the human–chimp divergence. Expand
Bitterness of the non-nutritive sweetener acesulfame potassium varies with polymorphisms in TAS2R9 and TAS2R31.
TLDR
Data suggest multiple polymorphisms within TAS2Rs contribute to the ability to perceive the bitterness from acesulfame potassium, and this work modeled the simultaneous influence of these single nucleotide polymorphisms on acesolfame potassium bitterness. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-9 OF 9 REFERENCES
PTC taste blindness and the taste of caffeine
TASTE thresholds for the bitter substance PTC (phenylthiourea or phenylthiocarbamide) and related compounds containing the grouping (HNCS)showa bimodal distribution, leading to the designationExpand
Oral effects of hydrolytic enzymes on taste acuity in man.
  • E. Giroux, R. Henkin
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Life sciences. Pt. 1: Physiology and pharmacology
  • 1971
TLDR
Findings suggest that protein exposed to the oral environment is involved in an event common to the appreciation of all four taste qualities. Expand
Sex Differences in Taste Preference for Glucose and Saccharin Solutions
TLDR
Taste preferences of mature male and female rats for caloric and noncaloric sweet solutions have been found to differ, and females prefer significantly higher concentrations of saccharin than males do. Expand
INHERITANCE OF THE P.T.C. TASTE CHARACTER IN MAN: AN ANALYSIS OF 126 RÁTRHI BRAHMIN FAMILIES OF WEST BENGAL
  • S. Das
  • Mathematics, Medicine
  • Annals of human genetics
  • 1958
TLDR
The taste threshold data for 127 families have been given, of which one family has been rejected on account of illegitimacy, and the results are compared to P.T.C.1. Expand
Collagenolytic Activity of Intact and Necrotic Connective Tissue
Isotonic saline extracts of both intact and necrotic skin of the rat were capable of releasing over 50 percent of the hydroxyproline content of soluble collagen as dialyzable, peptide-bound aminoExpand
PHARMACOGENETIC ASPECTS OF GUSTATION.
Genetics of Sensory Thresholds: Taste for Phenyl Thio Carbamide.
  • A. Blakeslee
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1932