Divergence time estimation using fossils as terminal taxa and the origins of Lissamphibia.

@article{Pyron2011DivergenceTE,
  title={Divergence time estimation using fossils as terminal taxa and the origins of Lissamphibia.},
  author={Robert Alexander Pyron},
  journal={Systematic biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={60 4},
  pages={
          466-81
        }
}
  • R. A. Pyron
  • Published 1 July 2011
  • Environmental Science, Biology, Geography
  • Systematic biology
Were molecular data available for extinct taxa, questions regarding the origins of many groups could be settled in short order. As this is not the case, various strategies have been proposed to combine paleontological and neontological data sets. The use of fossil dates as node age calibrations for divergence time estimation from molecular phylogenies is commonplace. In addition, simulations suggest that the addition of morphological data from extinct taxa may improve phylogenetic estimation… 

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