Diuretics and mortality in acute renal failure*

@article{Uchino2004DiureticsAM,
  title={Diuretics and mortality in acute renal failure*},
  author={Shigehiko Uchino and Gordon S Doig and Rinaldo Bellomo and Hiroshi Morimatsu and Stanislao Morgera and Miet Schetz and Ian Tan and Catherine S. C. Bouman and Ettiene Macedo and Noel Gibney and Ashita J Tolwani and Claudio Ronco and John A. Kellum},
  journal={Critical Care Medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={32},
  pages={1669-1677}
}
Objective:According to recent research, diuretics may increase mortality in acute renal failure patients. The administration of diuretics in such patients has been discouraged. Our objective was to determine the impact of diuretics on the mortality rate of critically ill patients with acute renal failure. Design:Prospective, multiple-center, multinational epidemiologic study. Setting:Intensive care units from 54 centers and 23 countries. Patients:Patients were 1,743 consecutive patients who… 

Use of diuretics in shock: Temporal trends and clinical impacts in a propensity-matched cohort study

While the use of diuretic therapy in critically ill patients receiving vasopressors infusions augmented urine output, it was not associated with higher vasopressor requirements, AKI incidence, and need for renal replacement therapy.

Effect of Diuretic Use on 30-Day Postdialysis Mortality in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Acute Dialysis

Higher time-varying 3-day accumulative diuretic dose predicts mortality in postsurgical critically ill patients requiring acute dialysis, and higher diuretics doses are associated with hypotension and a lower intensity of dialysis.

Use of Diuretics is not associated with mortality in patients admitted to the emergency department: results from a cross-sectional study

Use of diuretics is not associated with mortality in an unselected cohort of patients presenting in an emergency room of patients at the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland.

Fluid balance, diuretic use, and mortality in acute kidney injury.

A positive fluid balance after AKI was strongly associated with mortality and post-AKI diuretic therapy was associated with 60-day patient survival in FACTT patients with ALI; this effect may be mediated by fluid balance.

Patterns of diuretic use in the intensive care unit

Modern patterns of diuretic use in the intensive care unit (ICU) are described, including diuretics type, combination, and dosing, which varied by patient-specific factors and by ICU type.

Furosemide is associated with acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

  • T. LeviM. S. Rocha C. Cruz
  • Medicine
    Brazilian journal of medical and biological research = Revista brasileira de pesquisas medicas e biologicas
  • 2012
Age, use of furosemide, and septic shock were predictors of AKI in critically ill patients in a hospital cohort in which 344 patients were consecutively enrolled from January 2010 to January 2011.

Loop diuretics in the management of acute renal failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Loop diuretics were not associated with improved mortality or rate of independence from RRT, but were associated with shorter duration of RRT and increased urine output, however, these findings have limited relevance to critically ill patients.

Diuretics in the management of acute kidney injury: a multinational survey.

Clinicians are most familiar with furosemide given intravenously and titrated to a physiologic endpoint of urine output, which is a prime physiologic indication for diuretic use in AKI.

Early diuretic use and mortality in critically ill patients with vasopressor support: a propensity score-matching analysis

Although residual confounding cannot be excluded, loop diuretic use is associated with lower mortality in critically ill patients with vasopressor support.
...

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