Distribution of fitness effects caused by random insertion mutations in Escherichia coli

@article{Elena2004DistributionOF,
  title={Distribution of fitness effects caused by random insertion mutations in Escherichia coli},
  author={Santiago F. Elena and Lynette Ekunwe and Neerja Hajela and Shenandoah A. Oden and Richard E. Lenski},
  journal={Genetica},
  year={2004},
  volume={102-103},
  pages={349-358}
}
Very little is known about the distribution of mutational effects on organismal fitness, despite the fundamental importance of this information for the study of evolution. This lack of information reflects the fact that it is generally difficult to quantify the dynamic effects of mutation and natural selection using only static distributions of allele frequencies. In this study, we took a direct approach to measuring the effects of mutations on fitness. We used transposon-mutagenesis to create… Expand
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