Distribution of Wolbachia among neotropical arthropods

@article{Werren1995DistributionOW,
  title={Distribution of Wolbachia among neotropical arthropods},
  author={John H. Werren and Donald M. Windsor and Li Rong Guo},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1995},
  volume={262},
  pages={197 - 204}
}
Wolbachia are a group of cytoplasmically inherited bacteria that cause reproduction alterations in arthropods, including parthenogenesis, reproductive incompatibility and feminization of genetic males. Two major subdivisions of Wolbachia (A and B) occur. Wolbachia are found in a number of well-studied insects, but their overall distribution in arthropods has not been well studied. A survey for Wolbachia in 157 Panamanian neotropical arthropod species was done using a polymerase chain reaction… Expand

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