Distribution of Auditory and Visual Naming Sites in Nonlesional Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients and Patients with Space‐Occupying Temporal Lobe Lesions

@article{Hamberger2007DistributionOA,
  title={Distribution of Auditory and Visual Naming Sites in Nonlesional Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients and Patients with Space‐Occupying Temporal Lobe Lesions},
  author={Marla J Hamberger and Shearwood McClelland and Guy Mckhann and Alicia C. Williams and Robert R. Goodman},
  journal={Epilepsia},
  year={2007},
  volume={48}
}
Summary:  Purpose: Current knowledge regarding the topography of essential language cortex is based primarily on stimulation mapping studies of nonlesional epilepsy patients. We sought to determine whether space‐occupying temporal lobe lesions are associated with a similar topography of language sites, as this information would be useful in surgical planning. 
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TLDR
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Language Organization and Reorganization in Epilepsy
TLDR
Clinical variables have been shown to contribute to cerebral language reorganization in the setting of chronic seizure disorders, yet such factors have not been reliable predictors of altered language networks in individual patients, underscoring the need for language lateralization and localization procedures when definitive identification of language cortex is necessary for clinical care.
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