Distribution and seasonal abundance of benthic macroinvertebrates in a subtropical Florida lake

Abstract

We studied the distribution and seasonal abundance of benthic macroinvertebrates from July 1975 through September 1976 in a hypereutrophic lake in subtropical Florida. The benthic community was comprised principally of oligochaetes (56.1%), chironomids (37.1%), and chaoborids (5.7%). Numbers of taxa and mean densities correlated negatively with depth and positively with mean grain size of the substratum and dissolved oxygen concentration at the mud-water interface. Seasonal abundances and life history information obtained for the predominant species of Chironomidae (Polypedilum halterale, Glyptotendipes paripes, Chironomus crassicaudatus, Cryptochironomus fulvus, C. blarina, Cladotanytarsus sp., Procladius culiciformis, and Coelotanypus concinnus) indicated that all of these species are multivoltine with rapid generation times. Larval lengths of life at summer temperatures, 27–31 °C, ranged from 14–22 days indicating that sampling in subtropical lakes should be at short intervals (approximately 3 days) if the life cycles, ecology, and function of the components of the benthic community is to be understood.

DOI: 10.1007/BF00007582

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Cite this paper

@article{Cowell2004DistributionAS, title={Distribution and seasonal abundance of benthic macroinvertebrates in a subtropical Florida lake}, author={Bruce C. Cowell and Darrell S. Vodopich}, journal={Hydrobiologia}, year={2004}, volume={78}, pages={97-105} }