Distributed graph problems through an automata-theoretic lens

@inproceedings{Chang2020DistributedGP,
  title={Distributed graph problems through an automata-theoretic lens},
  author={Yi-Jun Chang and Jan Studen'y and Jukka Suomela},
  booktitle={DISC},
  year={2020}
}
The locality of a graph problem is the smallest distance $T$ such that each node can choose its own part of the solution based on its radius-$T$ neighborhood. In many settings, a graph problem can be solved efficiently with a distributed or parallel algorithm if and only if it has a small locality. In this work we seek to automate the study of solvability and locality: given the description of a graph problem $\Pi$, we would like to determine if $\Pi$ is solvable and what is the asymptotic… 

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