Corpus ID: 17945060

Distributed Cryptography Based on the Proofs of Work

@article{Andrychowicz2014DistributedCB,
  title={Distributed Cryptography Based on the Proofs of Work},
  author={Marcin Andrychowicz and Stefan Dziembowski},
  journal={IACR Cryptol. ePrint Arch.},
  year={2014},
  volume={2014},
  pages={796}
}
Motivated by the recent success of Bitcoin we study the question of constructing distributed crypto- graphic protocols in a fully peer-to-peer scenario (without any trusted setup) under the assumption that the adver- sary has limited computing power. We propose a formal model for this scenario and then we construct the following protocols working in it: (i) a broadcast protocol secure under the assumption that the honest parties have computing power that is some non-negligible fraction of… Expand
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