• Corpus ID: 215737163

Distributed Algorithms, the Lov\'{a}sz Local Lemma, and Descriptive Combinatorics

@article{Bernshteyn2020DistributedAT,
  title={Distributed Algorithms, the Lov\'\{a\}sz Local Lemma, and Descriptive Combinatorics},
  author={Anton Bernshteyn},
  journal={arXiv: Combinatorics},
  year={2020}
}
In this paper we consider coloring problems on graphs and other combinatorial structures on standard Borel spaces. Our goal is to obtain sufficient conditions under which such colorings can be made well-behaved in the sense of topology or measure. To this end, we show that such well-behaved colorings can be produced using certain powerful techniques from finite combinatorics and computer science. First, we prove that efficient distributed coloring algorithms (on finite graphs) yield well… 

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