Distinguishing signals and cues: bumblebees use general footprints to generate adaptive behaviour at flowers and nest

@article{Saleh2007DistinguishingSA,
  title={Distinguishing signals and cues: bumblebees use general footprints to generate adaptive behaviour at flowers and nest},
  author={Nehal Saleh and Alan G. Scott and Gareth P. Bryning and Lars Chittka},
  journal={Arthropod-Plant Interactions},
  year={2007},
  volume={1},
  pages={119-127}
}
Chemicals used in communication are divided into signals and cues. Signals are moulded by natural selection to carry specific meanings in specific contexts. Cues, on the other hand, have not been moulded by natural selection to carry specific information for intended receivers. Distinguishing between these two modes of information transfer is difficult when animals do not perform obvious secretion behaviours. Although a number of insects have been suspected of leaving cues at food sites and… Expand

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