Distinguishing angiophytes from the earliest angiosperms: A Lower Cretaceous (Valanginian-Hauterivian) fruit-like reproductive structure.

@article{Stockey2009DistinguishingAF,
  title={Distinguishing angiophytes from the earliest angiosperms: A Lower Cretaceous (Valanginian-Hauterivian) fruit-like reproductive structure.},
  author={Ruth A. Stockey and Gar W Rothwell},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2009},
  volume={96 1},
  pages={
          323-35
        }
}
A remarkably diverse Lower Cretaceous (Valanginian-Hauterivian) flora at Apple Bay, Vancouver Island, preserves seed plants at an important time of floristic evolutionary transition, about the same time as the earliest flowering plant megafossils. The fossils are permineralized in carbonate concretions and include tetrahedral seeds within cupule- or carpel-like structures. These enclosing structures, composed of elongate sclerenchyma cells with spiral thickenings that grade externally to a few… 

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