Distinguishing addiction and high engagement in the context of online game playing

@article{Charlton2007DistinguishingAA,
  title={Distinguishing addiction and high engagement in the context of online game playing},
  author={John P. Charlton and Ian D. W. Danforth},
  journal={Comput. Hum. Behav.},
  year={2007},
  volume={23},
  pages={1531-1548}
}
Validating the distinction between computer addiction and engagement: online game playing and personality
TLDR
Psychometric measures of engagement and addiction to the MMORPG taking into account the distinction between core and peripheral addiction criteria are shown to be differentially related to personality factors.
Core and Peripheral Criteria of Video Game Addiction in the Game Addiction Scale for Adolescents
TLDR
The current results suggest that the CORE 4 approach might be more appropriate for classification of problem gamers and addicted gamers compared to the GAS 7 approach.
1 Differentiating computer-related addictions and high engagement
This paper discusses the difference between computing-related addictions and high engagement in computing activities. The results of two studies are reviewed, one involving factor analysis of paper
Distinguishing Addiction From High Engagement
This study investigated certain social aspects of young massively multiplayer online game (MMOG) players’ lives in the context of pathological gameplay while distinguishing addiction from high
The role of social motivation and sociability of gamers in online game addiction
Massively multiplayer online (MMO) games represent a long-standing, intensive and wide spread type of online applications whose popularity continues to grow. Although just a mere entertainment and
Validity and Reliability Assessment of the Game Addiction Scale: An Empirical Finding from Indonesia
The game addiction scale (GAS) by Lemmens, Valkenburg, and Peter is a popular tool that is frequently used to evaluate game playing by adolescents. The scale that showed high reliabilities was tested
Gamers' insights into the phenomenology of normal gaming and game "addiction": A mixed methods study
TLDR
It is suggested that collaborative knowledge-building approaches may help researchers and policymakers understand the characteristics and processes specific to problematic video game play and improve content validity of IGD criteria.
Established risk factors for addiction fail to discriminate between healthy gamers and gamers endorsing DSM-5 Internet gaming disorder
TLDR
This study compared online gamers who do or do not endorse IGD criteria regarding self-control-related abilities (impulsivity, inhibitory control, and decision-making), considered the hallmarks of addictive behaviors.
Development of the game addiction inventory for adults (GAIA)
This study describes the development of the Game Addiction Inventory for Adults (GAIA). First, a pool of 147 video game addiction-related items was generated from interviews with 25 people who have
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 39 REFERENCES
A factor-analytic investigation of computer 'addiction' and engagement.
TLDR
It is concluded that Brown's conception of behavioural addiction can be applied toComputer-related behaviour, although the relationship of milder facets of addiction, which are also merely indicative of high engagement, to computer-related addictions is non-unique.
Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Internet Use and Addiction
TLDR
It appears that Internet addiction may involve an addictive performance profile which in turn leads to excessive behaviors that involve (1) use of the Internet for sexual purposes and (2) its functional usefulness for a variety of professional and personal goals.
Validation of a New Scale for Measuring Problematic Internet Use: Implications for Pre-employment Screening
TLDR
The utility of the OCS for both clinical assessment of Internet addiction and as an organizational preemployment screening measure to identify potential employees who are likely to abuse the Internet in the workplace (also known as "cyberslacking") were discussed.
Problematic Internet use and psychosocial well-being: development of a theory-based cognitive-behavioral measurement instrument
TLDR
Results suggest that one's preference for computer-mediated social interaction, as opposed to face-to-face interaction, plays a role in the etiology, development, and outcomes of generalized PIU.
Internet Addiction: The Emergence of a New Clinical Disorder
  • K. Young
  • Psychology, Computer Science
    Cyberpsychology Behav. Soc. Netw.
  • 1998
TLDR
This study investigated the existence of Internet addiction and the extent of problems caused by such potential misuse by developing a brief eight-item questionnaire referred to as a Diagnostic Questionnaire (DQ), which can be defined as an impulse-control disorder that does not involve an intoxicant.
Dependence on Computer Games by Adolescents
TLDR
As computer game playing is a popular activity among adolescents, a questionnaire study was undertaken with 387 adolescents to establish their “dependence” using a scale adapted from the DSM-III-R criteria for pathological gambling to indicate one in five adolescents were currently “dependent” upon computer games.
Incidence and correlates of pathological Internet use among college students ? ? Portions of this pa
This study surveyed 277 undergraduate Internet users, a population considered to be high risk for pathological Internet use (PIU), to assess incidence of PIU as well as characteristics of the
Breaking the Stereotype: The Case of Online Gaming
TLDR
Sociodemographics data provided clear evidence that the game clientele is very much an adult profile and suggest a different picture to the stereotypical image of an adolescent online gamer.
The bits and bytes of computer/internet addiction: A factor analytic approach
TLDR
Data support the notion that some individuals have a mixture of obsessive-like characteristics related specifically to their computer/Internet use but that, not surprisingly, they also exhibit a preference for on-line, rather than in-person, interactions.
A cognitive-behavioral model of pathological Internet use
  • R. Davis
  • Psychology, Computer Science
    Comput. Hum. Behav.
  • 2001
...
1
2
3
4
...