Distinct Ideas and Perfect Solicitude: Alexander of Hales, Richard Rufus, and Odo Rigaldus

@article{Wood1993DistinctIA,
  title={Distinct Ideas and Perfect Solicitude: Alexander of Hales, Richard Rufus, and Odo Rigaldus},
  author={Rega Wood},
  journal={Franciscan Studies},
  year={1993},
  volume={53},
  pages={31 - 7}
}
  • Rega Wood
  • Published 1993
  • Philosophy
  • Franciscan Studies
God's care for his creatures is perfect. Scripture assures us that God knows each of them individually: Are not five sparrows sold for two pennies? And not one of them is forgotten before God. Why, even the hairs of your head are all numbered (Lk. 12:6-7). But most Christians also hold that God's simplicity is perfect, and prominent theologians of the early 13th century agree that this means that God does not have a different concept or idea for each creature. There is only one divine idea… 
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