Distinct Brain Systems for Processing Concrete and Abstract Concepts

@article{Binder2005DistinctBS,
  title={Distinct Brain Systems for Processing Concrete and Abstract Concepts},
  author={Jeffrey R. Binder and Chris F. Westbury and Kristen A. McKiernan and Edward T. Possing and David A. Medler},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2005},
  volume={17},
  pages={905-917}
}
Behavioral and neurophysiological effects of word imageability and concreteness remain a topic of central interest in cognitive neuroscience and could provide essential clues for understanding how the brain processes conceptual knowledge. We examined these effects using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants identified concrete and abstract words. Relative to nonwords, concrete and abstract words both activated a left-lateralized network of multimodal association… Expand
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