Distances, Luminosities, and Temperatures of the Coldest Known Substellar Objects

@article{Dupuy2013DistancesLA,
  title={Distances, Luminosities, and Temperatures of the Coldest Known Substellar Objects},
  author={T. Dupuy and A. Kraus},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={341},
  pages={1492 - 1495}
}
  • T. Dupuy, A. Kraus
  • Published 2013
  • Physics, Medicine
  • Science
  • Assessing Brown Dwarfs The last 2 years have seen the detection of dozens of very cold brown dwarfs. At temperatures around 300 to 500 kelvin, brown dwarfs are expected to have masses comparable to those of gas-giant planets, but because their distances are unknown, it has not been possible to estimate their masses. Dupuy and Kraus (p. 1492, published online 5 September) used data from the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure accurate distances to very cold brown dwarfs, which allowed them to… CONTINUE READING
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