Dissociable roles of the central and basolateral amygdala in appetitive emotional learning

@article{Parkinson2000DissociableRO,
  title={Dissociable roles of the central and basolateral amygdala in appetitive emotional learning},
  author={John A. Parkinson and Trevor William Robbins and Barry J. Everitt},
  journal={European Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2000},
  volume={12}
}
The amygdala is considered to be a core component of the brain's fear system. Data from neuroimaging studies of normal volunteers and brain‐damaged patients perceiving emotional facial expressions, and studies of conditioned freezing in rats, all suggest a specific role for the amygdala in aversive motivation. However, the amygdala may also be critical for emotional processing in positive or appetitive settings. Using an appetitive Pavlovian approach procedure we show a theoretically important… 
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