Dissociable contributions within the medial temporal lobe to encoding of object-location associations.

@article{Sommer2005DissociableCW,
  title={Dissociable contributions within the medial temporal lobe to encoding of object-location associations.},
  author={Tobias Sommer and Michael Rose and Jan Gl{\"a}scher and Thomas Wolbers and Christian B{\"u}chel},
  journal={Learning \& memory},
  year={2005},
  volume={12 3},
  pages={
          343-51
        }
}
The crucial role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in episodic memory is well established. Although there is little doubt that its anatomical subregions-the hippocampus, peri-, entorhinal and parahippocampal cortex (PHC)-contribute differentially to mnemonic processes, their specific functions in episodic memory are under debate. Data from animal, human lesion, and neuroimaging studies suggest somewhat contradictory perspectives on this functional specialization: a general participation in… 

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