Dissociable Temporal Lobe Activations during Emotional Episodic Memory Retrieval

@article{Dolan2000DissociableTL,
  title={Dissociable Temporal Lobe Activations during Emotional Episodic Memory Retrieval},
  author={Raymond J. Dolan and Richard D. Lane and P. M-L. Chua and Paul C. Fletcher},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2000},
  volume={11},
  pages={203-209}
}
The richness of human recollective experience is, in part, related to evocation of previously experienced emotions. An extensive functional neuroimaging literature has provided a description of brain regions involved in retrieving emotionally neutral episodic memories. Whether similar or distinct systems are involved in retrieving emotional memories is unresolved. This question motivated the present functional neuroimaging study, using 0-15 positron emission tomography (PET), where we compared… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Neural activity associated with episodic memory for emotional context
fMRI correlates of the episodic retrieval of emotional contexts
Remembering one year later: role of the amygdala and the medial temporal lobe memory system in retrieving emotional memories.
  • F. Dolcos, K. LaBar, R. Cabeza
  • Psychology, Biology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2005
TLDR
The role of the amygdala and the medial temporal lobe memory regions in recollection and familiarity of emotional memory after lengthy retention intervals is clarified.
Dissociable Medial Temporal Lobe Contributions to Social Memory
TLDR
Whether amygdala activity supports emotional memory during the more subtle social interactions that punctuate everyday life is investigated, suggesting a role for the amygdala in providing a nonspecific arousal indicator in response to viewing individuals with emotionally colored pasts.
A Process-specific Functional Dissociation of the Amygdala in Emotional Memory
TLDR
A direct comparison between both stages revealed that whereas the right amygdala was involved in emotional memory formation, the retrieval of those memories relied on the left amygdala, demonstrating a hemispheric dissociation of amygdala involvement in different stages of emotional memory in humans.
Recapitulating emotional context: activity of amygdala, hippocampus and fusiform cortex during recollection and familiarity
TLDR
Data suggest that the amygdalae and hippocampi contribute to the retrieval of emotion‐laden context memories by coordinating the reactivation of stored representations in neocortical areas, such as the FFA.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 54 REFERENCES
The Mind's Eye—Precuneus Activation in Memory-Related Imagery
TLDR
Memory-related imagery was associated with significant activation of a medial parietal area, the precuneus, which provides strong evidence that it is a key part of the neural substate of visual imagery occurring in conscious memory recall.
The functional neuroanatomy of episodic memory
Neural activation during selective attention to subjective emotional responses
TLDR
The findings indicated a specific role for the anterior cingulate cortex in representing subjective emotional responses and are consistent with a suggested role for associated medial prefrontal structures in representing states of mind.
The possible contribution of the amygdala to memory.
The processing of episodic memories is believed to depend on the proper functioning of so-called bottleneck structures through which information apparently must pass in order to be stored long term.
Amygdala activity at encoding correlated with long-term, free recall of emotional information.
TLDR
The findings support the view derived from both animal and human investigations that the AC is selectively involved with the formation of enhanced long-term memory associated with emotionally arousing events.
Amygdala activity related to enhanced memory for pleasant and aversive stimuli
TLDR
It is shown that bilateral amygdala activity during memory encoding is correlated with enhanced episodic recognition memory for both pleasant and aversive visual stimuli relative to neutral stimuli, and that this relationship is specific to emotional stimuli.
Right temporofrontal cortex as critical locus for the ecphory of old episodic memories.
TLDR
It is concluded that the ecphory of old autobiographical memories relies heavily on an activation of the right lateral temporofrontal junction area, but that probably only some complementary left hemispheric damage to these regions will lead to major and persistent retrograde amnesia.
Involvement of the amygdala in memory storage: interaction with other brain systems.
TLDR
Findings provide strong evidence supporting the hypothesis that the amygdala is involved in modulating long-term memory storage, as well as supporting the central hypothesis guiding the research reviewed in this paper.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...