Disruption of hydrogen bonding between plant cell wall polymers by proteins that induce wall extension.

@article{McQueenMason1994DisruptionOH,
  title={Disruption of hydrogen bonding between plant cell wall polymers by proteins that induce wall extension.},
  author={S. McQueen-Mason and D. Cosgrove},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1994},
  volume={91 14},
  pages={
          6574-8
        }
}
  • S. McQueen-Mason, D. Cosgrove
  • Published 1994
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Plant cell enlargement is controlled by the ability of the constraining cell wall to expand. This ability has been postulated to be under the control of polysaccharide hydrolases or transferases that weaken or rearrange the loadbearing polymeric networks in the wall. We recently identified a family of wall proteins, called expansins, that catalyze the extension of isolated plant cell walls. Here we report that these proteins mechanically weaken pure cellulose paper in extension assays and… Expand
Plant cell enlargement and the action of expansins
  • D. Cosgrove
  • Biology, Medicine
  • BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology
  • 1996
TLDR
Comparison of expansin cDNAs from cucumber, pea, Arabidopsis and rice shows that the proteins are highly conserved in size and amino acid sequence, and suggests that this multigene family diverged before the evolution of angiosperms. Expand
Lipid Transfer Proteins Enhance Cell Wall Extension in Tobaccow⃞
TLDR
A type of cell wall–loosening protein is reported that does not share any homology with expansins but is a member of the lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), and it is hypothesized that LTP associates with hydrophobic wall compounds, causing nonhydrolytic disruption of the cell wall and subsequently facilitating wall extension. Expand
Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants.
  • D. Cosgrove
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annual review of cell and developmental biology
  • 1997
TLDR
A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins, which appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Expand
Investigation of the cell-wall loosening protein expansin as a possible additive in the enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass
TLDR
Although expansins do not hydrolyze cellulose, they have been reported to enhance the hydrolysis of microcystalline cellulose by low levels of a mixed Trichoderma cellulase preparation. Expand
How do cell walls regulate plant growth?
  • D. Thompson
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Journal of experimental botany
  • 2005
TLDR
Experiments support the hypothesis that reducing cell wall free volume decreases extensibility, as well as alternatives including a model of cell wall biophysics in which cell wall polymers act as 'scaffolds' to regulate the space available for microfibril movement. Expand
Plant cell wall degrading and remodeling proteins : current perspectives
Lignocellulose constitutes a raw material with considerable potential for the production of fermentable sugars and the generation of biofuels. In nature, lignocellulosic waste from forestry,Expand
Cell-walls of growing plant cells
The plant primary cell wall is a three-dimensional interwoven network of cellulose microfibrils, cross-linked by xyloglucan and dispersed in a pectin matrix. It has been suggested that in the wall ofExpand
Endo-xyloglucan transferase, a new class of transferase involved in cell wall construction
TLDR
The amino acid sequence of the mature protein is extensively conserved in the five different plant species, indicating that EXT protein is ubiquitous among higher plants, and a group of xyloglucan related proteins (XRPs) with transferase activity in higher plants are disclosed. Expand
Stipe wall extension of Flammulina velutipes could be induced by an expansin-like protein from Helix aspersa.
TLDR
It is suggested that stipe wall extension may be mediated by endogenous expansin-like proteins that facilitate cell wall polymer slippage by disrupting noncovalent bonding between glucan chains or chitin chains. Expand
A fungal endoglucanase with plant cell wall extension activity.
TLDR
A wall hydrolytic enzyme from Trichoderma reesei with potent ability to induce extension of heat-inactivated type I cell walls is identified, Cel12A, a small endo-1,4-beta-glucanase (Cel12A) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 12. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 22 REFERENCES
Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, a new wall-loosening enzyme activity from plants.
TLDR
It is proposed that XET is responsible for cutting and rejoining intermicrofibrillar xyloglucan chains and that it thus causes the wall-loosening required for plant cell expansion. Expand
Proc. Natl. Acad Sci. USA 91
  • Proc. Natl. Acad Sci. USA 91
  • 1994
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91
  • Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91
  • 1994
J. Gen. Microbiol
  • J. Gen. Microbiol
  • 1993
Plant J
  • Plant J
  • 1993
Plant Physiol
  • Plant Physiol
  • 1993
Planta
  • Planta
  • 1993
Planta
  • Planta
  • 1993
Biochem. J
  • Biochem. J
  • 1992
J. Biol. Chem
  • J. Biol. Chem
  • 1992
...
1
2
3
...