Displacement of Japanese native bumblebees by the recently introduced Bombus terrestris (L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

@article{Inoue2007DisplacementOJ,
  title={Displacement of Japanese native bumblebees by the recently introduced Bombus terrestris (L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae)},
  author={Maki N. Inoue and Jun Yokoyama and Izumi Washitani},
  journal={Journal of Insect Conservation},
  year={2007},
  volume={12},
  pages={135-146}
}
The introduced Bombus terrestris has recently been naturalized in Japan and become dominant in some local communities. [...] Key Result There were considerable niche overlaps in flower resource use between B. terrestris and B. hypocrita sapporoensis/B. pseudobaicalensis. Bombus terrestris also potentially competes for nest sites with B. hypocrita sapporoensis. During 3-year monitoring, B. pseudobaicalensis showed no noticeable change, but B. hypocrita sapporoensis decreased while B. terrestris increased…Expand

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