Dishonest ‘preemptive’ pursuit-deterrent signal? Why the turquoise-browed motmot wags its tail before feeding nestlings

@article{Murphy2007DishonestP,
  title={Dishonest ‘preemptive’ pursuit-deterrent signal? Why the turquoise-browed motmot wags its tail before feeding nestlings},
  author={Troy G Murphy},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2007},
  volume={73},
  pages={965-970}
}
  • Troy G Murphy
  • Published 1 June 2007
  • Environmental Science
  • Animal Behaviour

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