Disgust, Shame, and Soapy Water: Tests of Novel Interventions to Promote Safe Water and Hygiene

@article{Guiteras2016DisgustSA,
  title={Disgust, Shame, and Soapy Water: Tests of Novel Interventions to Promote Safe Water and Hygiene},
  author={Raymond Guiteras and David I. Levine and Stephen P. Luby and Thomas H. Polley and Kaniz Khatun-e-Jannat and Leanne Unicomb},
  journal={Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists},
  year={2016},
  volume={3},
  pages={321 - 359}
}
Lack of access to clean water is among the most pressing environmental problems in developing countries, where diarrheal disease kills nearly 700,000 children per year. While inexpensive and effective practices such as chlorination and hand washing with soap exist, efforts to motivate their use by emphasizing health benefits have seen only limited success. This paper measures the effect of messages appealing to negative emotions (disgust at consumption of human feces) and social pressure (shame… 
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