Disease prevention—should we target obesity or sedentary lifestyle?

@article{Charansonney2010DiseasePW,
  title={Disease prevention—should we target obesity or sedentary lifestyle?},
  author={O. Charansonney and J. Despr{\'e}s},
  journal={Nature Reviews Cardiology},
  year={2010},
  volume={7},
  pages={468-472}
}
Obesity is a major health challenge facing the modern world. Some evidence points to obesity itself as the main driver of premature mortality. We propose that this view is oversimplified. For example, high levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with lower mortality, even in those who are overweight or obese. To address this issue, we combine epidemiological and physiological evidence in a new paradigm that integrates excess calorie intake, sedentary behavior… Expand
Authors' reply: Disease prevention and sedentary lifestyle
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