Discussion on palaeoecology of the Late Triassic extinction event in the SW UKJournal, Vol. 165, 2008, pp. 319–332

@article{Radley2008DiscussionOP,
  title={Discussion on palaeoecology of the Late Triassic extinction event in the SW UKJournal, Vol. 165, 2008, pp. 319–332},
  author={Jonathan D. Radley and Richard J. Twitchett and Luke Mander and John C.W. Cope},
  journal={Journal of the Geological Society},
  year={2008},
  volume={165},
  pages={988 - 992}
}
Jonathan Radley writes: The Penarth Group (of Late Triassic and possibly ranging to Early Jurassic age) of the southern UK marks a marine transgression and the establishment of a shallow epicontinental seaway (Hallam & El Shaarawy 1982; Warrington & Ivimey-Cook 1992), influenced by regressive–transgressive pulses and characterized by rapid facies changes (Hallam & Wignall 2004; Hesselbo et al . 2004). A well-documented invertebrate macrofauna includes corals, brachiopods, molluscs and… 
Milankovitch-scale palynological turnover across the Triassic–Jurassic transition at St. Audrie's Bay, SW UK
Abstract: A high-resolution palynological study of the Triassic–Jurassic boundary in the St. Audrie's Bay section revealed a palynofloral transition interval with four pronounced spore peaks in the
A microbial carbonate response in synchrony with the end-Triassic mass extinction across the SW UK
TLDR
Findings indicate microbialites from the SW UK capture a nonlocal biosedimentary response to the cascading effects of massive volcanism and add to the current understanding of paleoecology in the aftermath of the end-Triassic extinction.
COMMENT TO IBARRA ET AL. MICROFACIES OF THE COTHAM MARBLE: A TUBESTONE MICROBIALITE FROM THE UPPER TRIASSIC, SOUTHWESTERN U.K
Ibarra et al. (2014) have presented an interesting paper on the Cotham Marble, an enigmatic microbialite from the Rhaetian Penarth Group of SW England, and an iconic piece of British stratigraphy.
MICROFACIES OF THE COTHAM MARBLE: A TUBESTONE CARBONATE MICROBIALITE FROM THE UPPER TRIASSIC, SOUTHWESTERN U.K.
ABSTRACT A remarkably aerially extensive (∼2,000 km2) unit of carbonate microbialites occurs in many Triassic–Jurassic boundary interval outcrops of the southwestern United Kingdom and captures
Large Igneous Provinces
Multiple lines of evidence suggest that volcanic and thermogenic gas emanations from the voluminous eruptions of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) triggered the end‐Triassic mass
Microbes and mass extinctions: paleoenvironmental distribution of microbialites during times of biotic crisis
TLDR
The case for microbialites behaving as 'disaster forms' in the aftermath of mass extinctions accurately describes the response following the Late Devonian and end-Permian events, and this may be because each is marked by the reduction of reef communities in addition to a suppression of bioturbation related to the development of shallow-water anoxia.
Body size changes in bivalves of the family Limidae in the aftermath of the end‐Triassic mass extinction: the Brobdingnag effect
TLDR
It is shown that newly evolved species originate at small body sizes and undergo a within‐species size increase, most dramatically demonstrated by Plagiostoma giganteum (Sowerby) which, over two million years, increases in size by 179%.
MICROFACIES OF THE COTHAM MARBLE: A TUBESTONE CARBONATE MICROBIALITE FROM THE UPPER TRIASSIC SOUTHWESTERN U.K.: A REPLY
Mayall and Wright question interpretations in our microfacies analysis of the Cotham Marble microbialites (Ibarra et al. 2014) in which we primarily highlight previously overlooked aspects of Cotham
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