Discrepancy between use of lean body mass or nitrogen balance to determine protein requirements for adult cats

@article{Laflamme2013DiscrepancyBU,
  title={Discrepancy between use of lean body mass or nitrogen balance to determine protein requirements for adult cats},
  author={Dorothy P. Laflamme and Steven S. Hannah},
  journal={Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery},
  year={2013},
  volume={15},
  pages={691 - 697}
}
This study was undertaken to contrast the minimum protein intake needed to maintain nitrogen balance or lean body mass (LBM) in adult cats using a prospective evaluation of 24 adult, neutered male cats fed one to three different diets. Following a 1-month baseline period during which all cats consumed a 34% protein diet, cats were fed a 20% (LO), 26% (MOD) or 34% (HI) protein diet for 2 months. During the baseline period and following the 2-month feeding period, nitrogen balance was assessed… Expand
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