Discrepancy between Cranial and DNA Data of Early Americans: Implications for American Peopling

@article{Perez2009DiscrepancyBC,
  title={Discrepancy between Cranial and DNA Data of Early Americans: Implications for American Peopling},
  author={S. Ivan Perez and Valeria Bernal and Paula N. Gonzalez and Marina L Sardi and Gustavo G. Politis},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2009},
  volume={4}
}
Currently, one of the major debates about the American peopling focuses on the number of populations that originated the biological diversity found in the continent during the Holocene. The studies of craniometric variation in American human remains dating from that period have shown morphological differences between the earliest settlers of the continent and some of the later Amerindian populations. This led some investigators to suggest that these groups—known as Paleomericans and Amerindians… Expand
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