Discovery of two new satellites of Pluto

@article{Weaver2006DiscoveryOT,
  title={Discovery of two new satellites of Pluto},
  author={H. Weaver and S. Alan Stern and Max J. Mutchler and Andrew J. Steffl and Marc W. Buie and William J. Merline and John R. Spencer and Evangeline Fung Yu Young and Leslie A. Young},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={439},
  pages={943-945}
}
Pluto's first known satellite, Charon, was discovered in 1978. It has a diameter (∼1,200 km) about half that of Pluto, which makes it larger, relative to its primary, than any other moon in the Solar System. Previous searches for other satellites around Pluto have been unsuccessful, but they were not sensitive to objects ≲150 km in diameter and there are no fundamental reasons why Pluto should not have more satellites. Here we report the discovery of two additional moons around Pluto… 
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