Discovery of the elements with atomic numbers greater than or equal to 113 (IUPAC Technical Report)

@article{Barber2011DiscoveryOT,
  title={Discovery of the elements with atomic numbers greater than or equal to 113 (IUPAC Technical Report)},
  author={Robert C. Barber and Paul J. Karol and Hiromichi Nakahara and E. Vardaci and Erich Vogt},
  journal={Pure and Applied Chemistry},
  year={2011},
  volume={83},
  pages={1485 - 1498}
}
The IUPAC/IUPAP Joint Working Party (JWP) on the priority of claims to the discovery of new elements 113–116 and 118 has reviewed the relevant literature pertaining to several claims. In accordance with the criteria for the discovery of elements previously established by the 1992 IUPAC/IUPAP Transfermium Working Group (TWG), and reinforced in subsequent IUPAC/IUPAP JWP discussions, it was determined that the Dubna-Livermore collaborations share in the fulfillment of those criteria both for… 

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