Discovery of the FeO orange bands in the terrestrial night airglow spectrum obtained with OSIRIS on the Odin spacecraft

@article{Evans2010DiscoveryOT,
  title={Discovery of the FeO orange bands in the terrestrial night airglow spectrum obtained with OSIRIS on the Odin spacecraft},
  author={W. F. J. Evans and Richard L. Gattinger and Tom G. Slanger and D. V. Saran and Doug A. Degenstein and E. J. Llewellyn},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2010},
  volume={37}
}
An unidentified pseudo‐continuum in the 600 nm region is observed in the upper mesosphere with the limb‐scanning OSIRIS imaging spectrograph on‐board the Odin spacecraft. Averages of low latitude spectra at a series of tangent limb altitudes from 75 to 105 km are assembled and matched with synthetic spectra of the known night airglow emission band systems to isolate the underlying airglow continuum. The upper limit of the NO + O → NO2* air afterglow continuum component in the observed 600 nm… 

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Airglow emission lines of OH, O2, O and Na are commonly used to probe the MLT (mesosphere/lower thermosphere) region of the atmosphere. Furthermore, molecules like electronically excited NO, NiO and

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