Discovery of terpenoid and phenolic sweeteners from plants

@article{Kinghorn2002DiscoveryOT,
  title={Discovery of terpenoid and phenolic sweeteners from plants},
  author={A. Douglas Kinghorn and D. D. Soejarto},
  journal={Pure and Applied Chemistry},
  year={2002},
  volume={74},
  pages={1169 - 1179}
}
Several plant-derived compounds of the terpenoid and phenolic types have commercial use as sweeteners. In our research program directed toward the discovery of additional sweet compounds of these chemical classes, candidate sweet plants for laboratory investigation may be selected after scrutiny of the available literature, as a result of making inquiries in the field, and/or from a limited amount of organoleptic testing. Sweet-tasting plants are extracted according to a standard protocol, and… 

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