Discovery of species-wide tool use in the Hawaiian crow

@article{Rutz2016DiscoveryOS,
  title={Discovery of species-wide tool use in the Hawaiian crow},
  author={Christian Rutz and Barbara C. Klump and Lisa Komarczyk and Rosanna Leighton and Joshua Kramer and Saskia Wischnewski and Shoko Sugasawa and Michael B. Morrissey and Richard James and James J. H. St Clair and Richard A. Switzer and Bryce M. Masuda},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={537},
  pages={403-407}
}
Only a handful of bird species are known to use foraging tools in the wild. Amongst them, the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides) stands out with its sophisticated tool-making skills. Despite considerable speculation, the evolutionary origins of this species’ remarkable tool behaviour remain largely unknown, not least because no naturally tool-using congeners have yet been identified that would enable informative comparisons. Here we show that another tropical corvid, the ‘Alalā (C… Expand
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