Discovery of rotavirus: Implications for Child health

@article{Bishop2009DiscoveryOR,
  title={Discovery of rotavirus: Implications for Child health},
  author={Ruth F. Bishop},
  journal={Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology},
  year={2009},
  volume={24}
}
  • R. Bishop
  • Published 1 October 2009
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
For centuries, acute diarrhea has been a major worldwide cause of death in young children, and until 1973, no infectious agents could be identified in about 80% of patients admitted to hospital with severe dehydrating diarrhea. In 1973 Ruth Bishop, Geoffrey Davidson, Ian Holmes, and Brian Ruck identified abundant particles of a ‘new’ virus (rotavirus) in the cytoplasm of mature epithelial cells lining duodenal villi and in feces, from such children admitted to the Royal Children's Hospital… 
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