Discovery of a low frequency sound source in Mysticeti (baleen whales): Anatomical establishment of a vocal fold homolog

@article{Reidenberg2007DiscoveryOA,
  title={Discovery of a low frequency sound source in Mysticeti (baleen whales): Anatomical establishment of a vocal fold homolog},
  author={Joy S Reidenberg and Jeffrey T Laitman},
  journal={The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={290}
}
  • J. Reidenberg, J. Laitman
  • Published 1 June 2007
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
The mechanism of mysticete (baleen whale) vocalization has remained a mystery. [...] Key Method Laryngeal anatomy was examined in 37 specimens representing 6 mysticete species. Results indicate the presence of a U-shaped fold (U-fold) in the lumen of the larynx. The U-fold is supported by arytenoid cartilages, controlled by skeletal muscles innervated by the recurrent laryngeal nerve, is adjacent to a diverticulum (laryngeal sac) covered with mucosa innervated by the superior laryngeal nerve, and contains a…Expand
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