Discovery of Ganymede's magnetic field by the Galileo spacecraft

@article{Kivelson1996DiscoveryOG,
  title={Discovery of Ganymede's magnetic field by the Galileo spacecraft},
  author={Margaret G. Kivelson and Krishan K. Khurana and Christopher T. Russell and Raymond J. Walker and J. Warnecke and Ferdinand V. Coroniti and Carol A. Polanskey and David J. Southwood and Gerald Schubert},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1996},
  volume={384},
  pages={537-541}
}
THE Galileo spacecraft has now passed close to Jupiter's largest moon—Ganymede—on two occasions, the first at an altitude of 838 km, and the second at an altitude of just 264 km. Here we report the discovery during these encounters of an internal magnetic field associated with Ganymede (the only other solid bodies in the Solar System known to have magnetic fields are Mercury, Earth and probably lo1). The data are consistent with a Ganymede-centred magnetic dipole tilted by ∼10° relative to the… Expand
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