• Corpus ID: 160915609

Discovering literariness in the past : Literature vs. history in the Synopsis Chronike of Konstantinos Manasses

@inproceedings{Nilsson2006DiscoveringLI,
  title={Discovering literariness in the past : Literature vs. history in the Synopsis Chronike of Konstantinos Manasses},
  author={Ingela Nilsson},
  year={2006}
}
Discovering literariness in the past : Literature vs. history in the Synopsis Chronike of Konstantinos Manasses 
5 Citations
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