Discounting of Delayed Rewards: A Life-Span Comparison

@article{Green1994DiscountingOD,
  title={Discounting of Delayed Rewards: A Life-Span Comparison},
  author={Leonard Green and Astrid F. Fry and Joel Myerson},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={1994},
  volume={5},
  pages={33 - 36}
}
In this study, children, young adults, and older adults chose between immediate and delayed hypothetical monetary rewards The amount of the delayed reward was held constant while its delay was varied All three age groups showed delay discounting, that is, the amount of an immediate reward judged to be of equal value to the delayed reward decreased as a function of delay The rate of discounting was highest for children and lowest for older adults, predicting a life-span developmental trend… Expand

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