Disclosure of traumas and immune function: health implications for psychotherapy.

@article{Pennebaker1988DisclosureOT,
  title={Disclosure of traumas and immune function: health implications for psychotherapy.},
  author={James W. Pennebaker and J. K. Kiecolt-Glaser and Ronald Glaser},
  journal={Journal of consulting and clinical psychology},
  year={1988},
  volume={56 2},
  pages={
          239-45
        }
}
Can psychotherapy reduce the incidence of health problems? A general model of psychosomatics assumes that inhibiting or holding back one's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors is associated with long-term stress and disease. Actively confronting upsetting experiences--through writing or talking-is hypothesized to reduce the negative effects of inhibition. Fifty healthy undergraduates were assigned to write about either traumatic experiences or superficial topics for 4 consecutive days. Two… Expand
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Results from a series of studies are summarized in support of a general theory of inhibition and psychosomatics, suggesting childhood traumatic experiences, particularly those never discussed, are highly correlated with current health problems and ruminations about the traumas. Expand
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