Discerning the Origins of the Negritos, First Sundaland People: Deep Divergence and Archaic Admixture

@article{Jinam2017DiscerningTO,
  title={Discerning the Origins of the Negritos, First Sundaland People: Deep Divergence and Archaic Admixture},
  author={Timothy A. Jinam and Maude E. Phipps and Farhang A. Aghakhanian and Partha P. Majumder and Francisco A. Datar and Mark Stoneking and Hiromi Sawai and Nao Nishida and Katsushi Tokunaga and Shoji Kawamura and Keiichi Omoto and Naruya Saitou},
  journal={Genome Biology and Evolution},
  year={2017},
  volume={9},
  pages={2013 - 2022}
}
Abstract Human presence in Southeast Asia dates back to at least 40,000 years ago, when the current islands formed a continental shelf called Sundaland. In the Philippine Islands, Peninsular Malaysia, and Andaman Islands, there exist indigenous groups collectively called Negritos whose ancestry can be traced to the “First Sundaland People.” To understand the relationship between these Negrito groups and their demographic histories, we generated genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism data in… Expand
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