Disappearing Arctic sea ice reduces available water in the American west

@article{Sewall2004DisappearingAS,
  title={Disappearing Arctic sea ice reduces available water in the American west},
  author={Jacob O. Sewall and Lisa Cirbus Sloan},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2004},
  volume={31}
}
  • J. SewallL. Sloan
  • Published 1 March 2004
  • Environmental Science
  • Geophysical Research Letters
Recent decreases in Arctic sea ice cover and the probability of continued decreases have raised the question of how reduced Arctic sea ice cover will influence extrapolar climate. Using a fully coupled earth system model, we generate one possible future Arctic sea ice distribution. We use this “future” sea ice distribution and the corresponding sea surface temperatures (SSTs) to run a fixed SST and ice concentration experiment with the goal of determining direct climate responses to the… 

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