Disability support workers’ knowledge and education needs about psychotropic medication

@article{Donley2012DisabilitySW,
  title={Disability support workers’ knowledge and education needs about psychotropic medication},
  author={Mandy Donley and Jeffrey Chan and Lynne Suzanne Webber},
  journal={British Journal of Learning Disabilities},
  year={2012},
  volume={40},
  pages={286-291}
}
Accessible summary •  The staff who are paid to support people with an intellectual disability in Australia are called disability support workers. •  As part of their job, disability support workers give out medications when the doctor says to. Some of these medications are used to help people with disability to calm down when they are angry. Often, these medications are not for treating any illness. These medications can sometimes make people feel very ill. In the past, the staff who… 

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