Dis-Crediting Ocean Fertilization

@inproceedings{Chisholm2001DisCreditingOF,
  title={Dis-Crediting Ocean Fertilization},
  author={Sallie W. Chisholm and Paul G. Falkowski and John J Cullen},
  year={2001}
}
never exhausted in surface waters, and phytoplankton biomass is less than expected. Martin (6, 7) suggested that it is the scarcity of biologically available iron in these high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions that makes it impossible for the phytoplankton to use the excess N and P. He also recognized that atmospheric dust from land is an important source of iron for the sea and that HNLC regions receive a relatively small dust flux. Furthermore, he noted that ice core records of… CONTINUE READING

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Consensus, Certainty, and Catastrophe: Discourse, Governance, and Ocean Iron Fertilization

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The Iron Biogeochemical Cycle Past and Present

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Developing a test-bed for robust research governance of geoengineering: the contribution of ocean iron biogeochemistry

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