Directed evolution of proteins by exon shuffling

@article{Kolkman2001DirectedEO,
  title={Directed evolution of proteins by exon shuffling},
  author={Joost A. Kolkman and Willem Pim C Stemmer},
  journal={Nature Biotechnology},
  year={2001},
  volume={19},
  pages={423-428}
}
Evolution of eukaryotes is mediated by sexual recombination of parental genomes. Crossovers occur in random, but homologous, positions at a frequency that depends on DNA length. As exons occupy only 1% of the human genome and introns about 24%, by far most of the crossovers occur between exons, rather than inside. The natural process of creating new combinations of exons by intronic recombination is called exon shuffling. Our group is developing in vitro formats for exon shuffling and applying… 
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